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NETS -T Standards


NETS FOR TEACHERS 2008
(International Society for Technology in Education’s  
National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers 2008)

The most important challenge the U.S. educational system faces is not preparing students to do well on high stakes tests, but rather fostering 21st century skills and knowledge in learners so that they are prepared to participate in our global, knowledge-based civilization. This challenge requires both that teachers understand what types of knowledge and skills are required in leading edge workplaces (e.g., decision making under uncertainty, just-in-time learning, information filtering), and that teachers are themselves adept in generic higher order cognitive, affective, and social skills such as systems thinking, creativity, and collaboration.

(Dede 2000; Dede 2003; Partnership for 21st Century Skills 2003).

In 2008 the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) issued its National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T) and intended this document to be a companion document to the previously released 2007 National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). These two sets of standards reflected a fundamental shift in the way educators thought about technology in educational setting. Until these standards were released, the field of educational technology focused on “how” to use equipment rather than on “what” the educational benefits of technology-mediated learning environments could be (Maloy, et. al., 2011). Like other reform-minded educators, Technology Educators want the focus to be on learning rather than on mechanistic skill acquisitions.

The fact the ISTE’s initiatives focused on teachers and students suggests that they concur with Chris Dede’s admonishment that teachers must “understand what types of knowledge and skills are required in leading edge workplaces . . . and that teachers are themselves adept in generic higher order cognitive, affective, and social skills such as systems thinking, creativity, and collaboration.” Teachers, therefore, will need to embrace technology cognitively, affectively, and volitionally if they are to have any hope of helping to usher their students into an increasingly digitized 21st century.

In this section, the five NETS –T Standards for Teachers will be enumerated. The first of these standards focuses on learning and creativity and how to facilitate these qualities in students using technology. Creativity finds its way into the wording of this standard as it does in Naisbitt’s thinking, Dede’s research, and Elliott’s theoretical paradigm. The second standard looks as learning experiences and assessments via technology, while asking teachers to assess their own progress in the development of technology-enriched learning environments. The third standard asks teachers to model digital-age work and learning in their teaching, their work with families, and their action research activities. The call is for “use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning.” The fourth standard asks teachers to promote and model digital citizenship and responsibility. We cannot ask our students to respect “intellectual property” if we do not model its importance in “digital-age communication and collaboration.” The fifth, and final, standard focuses on professional growth and leadership. This need for self-renewal and for a willingness to assume leadership roles has never been so great as now when change-agents are needed in the “warp-speed” world our children are inheriting.

The results of a Self-Assessment on my achievement of the NETS-T Standards can be found at the end of this section of this Sabbatical Report 2010.

OUTLINE OF NETS-T STANDARDS

1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity (Click on parts a, b, c, and d to view reflections and artifacts & rationales for this standard.)

Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. Teachers:

  1. promote, support, and model creative and innovative thinking and inventiveness. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  2. engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  3. promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students’ conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  4. model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with students, colleagues, and others in face-to-face and virtual environments. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]

2. Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments (Click on parts a, b, c, and d to view reflections and artifacts & rationales for this standard.)

Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessment incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS•S. Teachers:

  1. Design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  2. develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  3. customize and personalize learning activities to address students’ diverse learning styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  4. provide students with multiple ad varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]

3. Model Digital-Age Work and Learning (Click on parts a, b, c, and d to view reflections and artifacts & rationales for this standard.)

Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society. Teachers:

  1. demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  2. collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using digital tools and resources to support student success and innovation. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  3. communicate relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents, and peers using a variety of digital-age media and formats. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  4. model and facilitate effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support resources and learning. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]

4. Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility (Click on parts a, b, c, and d to view reflections and artifacts & rationales for this standard.)

Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behavior in their professional practices. Teachers:

  1. advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  2. address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  3. promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  4. develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using digital-age communication and collaboration tools. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]

5. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership (Click on parts a, b, c, and d to view reflections and artifacts & rationales for this standard.)

Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources. Teachers:

  1. participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  2. exhibit leadership by demonstrating a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills of others. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  3. evaluate and reflect on current research and professional practice on a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]
  4. contribute to the effectiveness, vitality, and self-renewal of the teaching profession and of their school and community. [View reflections, then view artifacts & rationales]

© 2008 International Society for Technology in Education. ISTE® is a registered trademark of the International Society for Technology in Education.

World rights reserved. No part of this may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system—without prior written permission from the publisher.
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Little Passports

Author : chazrich

Charles is an English for Special Purposes (ESP) instructor for the US Government with experience in computers, technical writing, design, and of course, English instruction and with a Master's degree in Technology in Education. Charles can help you with a variety of things like copy writing, planning, and technology selection. He has experience with various LMS and LCMS systems and can help you decide if one is right for your needs. He's also the webmaster for this site.

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